BRIDGET'S GUIDE TO BOY BANDS

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  • BRIDGET'S GUIDE TO BOY BANDS

    O-TOWN

    Former blimp salesman turned boy band tycoon, Lou Pearlman, had a briiliant idea. He'd struck platinum twice with Backstreet Boys and N Sync, now it was time to go for the trifecta. But boy band #3 was going to be launched on an unsuspecting early 2000s public in a different, some might say innovative, manner. Rather than just recruit a bunch of singing, dancing ex-theme park employees and drama club showoffs, Pearlman took the bold notion of making a reality show about the assembling, rehearsing and launching of  brand new boy band. 

    The show was called Making The Band. The five recruits were collectively dubbed O-Town. The show was intermittently cheesy, tedious and gripping, especially when it confronted long-held suspicions that Pearlman was not the most honest businessman in the not-even-slightly honest music business. Despite their weekly presence, first on ABC, then MTV, time was not on O-Town's side. They saw a little bit of success but they leapt into the fray just as the boy band bubble was about to burst.

    Diddy took over the Making The Band franchise, turning it into an unmissable chronicle of torment and delusion, but for O-Town the liquid dream dried up.